Studies on Asia

Series III, Vol 2, No. 1, Spring 2005

Sponsored by:
Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs
Asian Studies Center, Michigan State University
Editor: Linda Cooke Johnson

©2005 Asian Studies Center, Michigan State University

Studies On Asia SERIES III, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Spring 2005
Tzushiu Chiu, Translator Hiding From the Rain by Gao Xingjian (pdf) 1
Parks M. Coble “Is China Going Capitalist?” The Debate Over Admitting Private Entrepreneurs to Membership in the Chinese Communist Party (pdf) 20
Maghiel Van Crevel Desecrations? The Poetics of Han Dong and Yu Jian (part One) (pdf) 28
Sidney DeVere Brown In Memory of Robert K. Sakai (pdf) 49

ISSN 1554-3749

A one-act play, Hiding from the Rain, by Nobel prize-winner Gao Xianjian features two young women and an old man who seek shelter from the rain in a shed. While the women discuss many aspects of their lives, ranging from the effects of the rain to frogs, landscapes, boyfriends, marriage, and the ultimate meaning of their lives. The old man, who has no dialogue, reacts eloquently to their discussion through his movements and body language. This graceful translation is by Tsushiu Chiu.

Parks M. Coble discusses the current economic and political situation in China with regards to participation of Communist party members in the development of capitalist enterprises in Is China Going Capitalist? The Debate over Admitting Private Entrepreneurs to Membership in the Chinese Communist Party.”

In Desecrations? The Poetics of Han Dong and Yu Jian, Part One, Maghiel van Crevel examines the verse-external poetics of Han Dong and Yu Jian, two of the most influential poets of post-Mao China : their views of poetry as expounded in poetical statements, essays, interviews and so on. Han and Yu are active desecrators of what Van Crevel calls Elevated styles in contemporary Chinese poetry, but their own, Earthly poetics frequently portrays ordinariness as a sacred quality that is susceptible to desecration in its turn. Part Two of the essay will appear in the fall issue of Studies on Asia.

Long-time MCAA member Sidney DeVere Brown remembers Robert K. Sakai in a eulogy to his friend and mentor of many years, one of the early members of the Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs and first editor of Studies on Asia. Professor Sakai taught at the University of Nebraska 1951-66 and later at the University of Hawaii . He died August 15, 2004 at the age of 85.